Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Making Your Business More Competitive with Business Process Reengineering (BPR)

Making Your Business More Competitive with Business Process Reengineering (BPR) HISTORY OF BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERINGBusiness process reengineering, also called BPR, is the redesign and analysis of workflow, in an effort to make it more efficient.In the early 1990’s, Michael Hammer and James Champy published a book, “Reengineering the Corporation”, that stated that in some cases, radical redesign and reorganization within a company were the only way to reduce costs and improve service quality. To this end, they said, information technology was the key element for allowing this to happen.Hammer and Champy said that most large companies made (now invalid) assumptions about their goals, people and technology that were impacting the workflow. They suggested seven principles that could be used to reengineer and help streamline workflows, thus improving quality, time management and cost.Hammer and Champy suggested the following seven principles in their book.Organize around outcomes, not tasks.Identify all the processes in an organization and prioritize them in order of redesign urgency.Integrate information processing work into the real work that produces the information.Treat geographically dispersed resources as though they were centralized.Link parallel activities in the workflow instead of just integrating their results.Put the decision point where the work is performed, and build control into the process.Capture information once and at the source.What does this mean in simpler language? Essentially, for a successful BPR effort, it is important to look at all the tasks that are working to achieve the same goal. This exercise can then allow several jobs to be combined into one. In addition, parallel processes leading to the same outcome should be connected within the process rather than just combining results at the end. Also, it is important to look at all available resources and place the actual work where it makes the most sense.To make the process most efficient, the power to make decisions regarding it should be given to the p eople performing the process and any unnecessary control systems should be eliminated. Instead of having extra processes to record information relating to the process, a resource within the process should provide all necessary data to increase accuracy and reduce redundancy.HOW TO IMPLEMENT BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING IN YOUR BUSINESSThe following steps (Davenport, 1992) can help BPR realize its core principles of customer satisfaction, reduced costs of business and increased competitiveness.1. BUSINESS VISION AND OBJECTIVESAny BPR activity needs to begin with a clearly defined and measurable objectives. Whether the goal is reducing costs, improving quality of product, or increasing efficiency, the framework for what needs to be achieved has to be decided upon at the outset, in line with the company’s vision and mission.2. IDENTIFICATION AND SLACKING PROCESSESOnce a clear goal is in mind, all processes need to be studied and those seen as ‘slacking’ or that can be improved need to be identified. Among these, those processes with direct impact on the company’s output or those that clash with the company’s mission become part of the ‘red’ list. This clear identification makes the difference between BPR success and failure.3. UNDERSTAND AND MEASURE THE RED PROCESSESWith a list of slacking processes in hand, it is imperative to identify how they were identified as such. Are they taking too much time to complete? Is the quality of the outcome being compromised? Whatever the issue, each process must be judged objectively either against industry standards or ethically obtained competitor best practices.4. INFORMATION SYSTEM AND TECHNOLOGY CAPABILITIESAn efficient and relevant IT system is an essential BPR enabler. Without such a system, it is not possible to keep a check on all factors affecting the change. Before setting out on a radical BPR activity, it is vital to set in place information systems that can deal with the magnitude of the change.5. D ESIGN, BUILD AND TEST THE NEW PROTOTYPEBefore any new product is launched, a prototype is tested out. A failure at a testing stage should never be implemented at a larger scale. BPR projects fail more often than not for a variety of reasons but a basic reason is the inability to identify and accept any limitations at the testing stage. Among other factors, both the management’s attitude towards the new way of work and the employees’   outlook towards the change should be carefully assessed.6. ADAPTING THE ORGANIZATIONManaging change brought about by BPR activities is the final effort towards a successful project. Providing updated documentation, organizational structures, governance models as well as updated charts of authority and responsibility leave little room for confusion and allow a smooth transition into the new way of work.Business process reengineering is a radical change activity that cannot be repeated if it goes wrong the first time. It is often a high risk activity that involves monetary investment and a risk of demotivated employees. In is essential to have buy in all the way from top management down and it should have a broad functional scope.SUCCESSES AND FAILURES OF BUSINESS PROVESS REENGINEERINGIt is important to acknowledge and understand that BPR is not a foolproof method of success. As with all activities it runs the risk of failure.A BPR program can be successful if:Customer needs are made the priority and this vision is used to appropriately direct business practices.There are cost advantages to be achieved that help the organization become more competitive in its industryA strategic view of all operational processes is taken with relevant questions being asked about the established way of work and how it can be developed over the long term into more efficient business practicesThere is a willingness to look beyond tasks and traditional functional boundaries with a focus outcomes. Through this, entire processes can be eliminated or amalgamated into fewer but more relevant and powerful processes throughout the organization.There is a real desire to simplify the way of work by objectively assessing all activities and tasks and eliminating any that add less value and more complexity.A BPR program will fail if:It is seen as a way to make minor adjustments and improvements to existing processes. If there is no clear willingness to put all existing process onto the chopping block, there is no chance of successIt is seen as a one-time cost cutting exercise. In reality, cost reductions are often a handy by product of the activity but not the primary concern. It is also not a one-time activity but an ongoing change in mindsetThere is no success in gaining dedicated long term commitment from management and the employees. Bringing people onboard is a difficult task and many BPR initiatives never take off because enough effort is not put into securing supportThere is less effort to redesign and more to automateOne departm ent is prioritized at the expense of the process. There needs to be an openness towards studying every single process in detail and a willingness to change whatever is needed to achieve overall efficiencyThere is too much internal focus and not enough of an eye on the industry and what competitor best practices can be used as benchmarksSOME FAMOUS EXAMPLES OF BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING The concept of business process reengineering (BPR) is to rethink and break down existing business processes. This allows a company to reduce costs and improve productivity through newer, more efficient processes. It is important to remember however, that though there are instances where this is necessary, business process reengineering is not without its disadvantages. This makes it vital to weigh your decision carefully. One of the most obvious adverse effects of a company’s decision to reengineer is a lowered employee morale. Most people are vary of change and do not manage to adapt to it easily. This aspect needs to be kept in mind when trying to make the decision to go through with the activity. © Shutterstock.com | TashatuvangoIn this article, we will discuss 1) the history of business process reengineering, 2) the steps to help you implement business process reengineering, 3) successes and failures of business process reengineering,  and 4) some famous examples.HISTORY OF BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERINGBusiness process reengineering, also called BPR, is the redesign and analysis of workflow, in an effort to make it more efficient.In the early 1990’s, Michael Hammer and James Champy published a book, “Reengineering the Corporation”, that stated that in some cases, radical redesign and reorganization within a company were the only way to reduce costs and improve service quality. To this end, they said, information technology was the key element for allowing this to happen.Hammer and Champy said that most large companies made (now invalid) assumptions about their goals, people and technology that were impacting the workflow. They suggested seven principles that could b e used to reengineer and help streamline workflows, thus improving quality, time management and cost.Hammer and Champy suggested the following seven principles in their book.Organize around outcomes, not tasks.Identify all the processes in an organization and prioritize them in order of redesign urgency.Integrate information processing work into the real work that produces the information.Treat geographically dispersed resources as though they were centralized.Link parallel activities in the workflow instead of just integrating their results.Put the decision point where the work is performed, and build control into the process.Capture information once and at the source.What does this mean in simpler language? Essentially, for a successful BPR effort, it is important to look at all the tasks that are working to achieve the same goal. This exercise can then allow several jobs to be combined into one. In addition, parallel processes leading to the same outcome should be connected withi n the process rather than just combining results at the end. Also, it is important to look at all available resources and place the actual work where it makes the most sense.To make the process most efficient, the power to make decisions regarding it should be given to the people performing the process and any unnecessary control systems should be eliminated. Instead of having extra processes to record information relating to the process, a resource within the process should provide all necessary data to increase accuracy and reduce redundancy.HOW TO IMPLEMENT BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING IN YOUR BUSINESSThe following steps (Davenport, 1992) can help BPR realize its core principles of customer satisfaction, reduced costs of business and increased competitiveness.1. BUSINESS VISION AND OBJECTIVESAny BPR activity needs to begin with a clearly defined and measurable objectives. Whether the goal is reducing costs, improving quality of product, or increasing efficiency, the framework f or what needs to be achieved has to be decided upon at the outset, in line with the company’s vision and mission.2. IDENTIFICATION AND SLACKING PROCESSESOnce a clear goal is in mind, all processes need to be studied and those seen as ‘slacking’ or that can be improved need to be identified. Among these, those processes with direct impact on the company’s output or those that clash with the company’s mission become part of the ‘red’ list. This clear identification makes the difference between BPR success and failure.3. UNDERSTAND AND MEASURE THE RED PROCESSESWith a list of slacking processes in hand, it is imperative to identify how they were identified as such. Are they taking too much time to complete? Is the quality of the outcome being compromised? Whatever the issue, each process must be judged objectively either against industry standards or ethically obtained competitor best practices.4. INFORMATION SYSTEM AND TECHNOLOGY CAPABILITIESAn efficient and relevant IT s ystem is an essential BPR enabler. Without such a system, it is not possible to keep a check on all factors affecting the change. Before setting out on a radical BPR activity, it is vital to set in place information systems that can deal with the magnitude of the change.5. DESIGN, BUILD AND TEST THE NEW PROTOTYPEBefore any new product is launched, a prototype is tested out. A failure at a testing stage should never be implemented at a larger scale. BPR projects fail more often than not for a variety of reasons but a basic reason is the inability to identify and accept any limitations at the testing stage. Among other factors, both the management’s attitude towards the new way of work and the employees’   outlook towards the change should be carefully assessed.6. ADAPTING THE ORGANIZATIONManaging change brought about by BPR activities is the final effort towards a successful project. Providing updated documentation, organizational structures, governance models as well as updated charts of authority and responsibility leave little room for confusion and allow a smooth transition into the new way of work.Business process reengineering is a radical change activity that cannot be repeated if it goes wrong the first time. It is often a high risk activity that involves monetary investment and a risk of demotivated employees. In is essential to have buy in all the way from top management down and it should have a broad functional scope.SUCCESSES AND FAILURES OF BUSINESS PROVESS REENGINEERINGIt is important to acknowledge and understand that BPR is not a foolproof method of success. As with all activities it runs the risk of failure.A BPR program can be successful if:Customer needs are made the priority and this vision is used to appropriately direct business practices.There are cost advantages to be achieved that help the organization become more competitive in its industryA strategic view of all operational processes is taken with relevant questions being asked a bout the established way of work and how it can be developed over the long term into more efficient business practicesThere is a willingness to look beyond tasks and traditional functional boundaries with a focus outcomes. Through this, entire processes can be eliminated or amalgamated into fewer but more relevant and powerful processes throughout the organization.There is a real desire to simplify the way of work by objectively assessing all activities and tasks and eliminating any that add less value and more complexity.A BPR program will fail if:It is seen as a way to make minor adjustments and improvements to existing processes. If there is no clear willingness to put all existing process onto the chopping block, there is no chance of successIt is seen as a one-time cost cutting exercise. In reality, cost reductions are often a handy by product of the activity but not the primary concern. It is also not a one-time activity but an ongoing change in mindsetThere is no success in g aining dedicated long term commitment from management and the employees. Bringing people onboard is a difficult task and many BPR initiatives never take off because enough effort is not put into securing supportThere is less effort to redesign and more to automateOne department is prioritized at the expense of the process. There needs to be an openness towards studying every single process in detail and a willingness to change whatever is needed to achieve overall efficiencyThere is too much internal focus and not enough of an eye on the industry and what competitor best practices can be used as benchmarksSOME FAMOUS EXAMPLES OF BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERINGFORDIn his suggestions to Ford, Michael Hammer proposed something radical: Eliminate the invoice. In the new scenario, a buyer no longer needed to send a copy of the purchasing order form to the creditor administration. Instead, he registers an order in the online database. When the items appear at the store, the storekeeper che ck whether these correspond to the purchase order form in the system. In the old system he did not have access to this form. If the items match the order, he accepts them and registers this in the computer system. If they do not, the items are returned. Hammer reported that Ford benefited drastically from this change with an almost 75% decrease in workforce in the accounts payable department.TACO BELLTaco Bell reimagined their business, focusing more on the retail service aspect and centralizing the manufacturing area. The K-Minus program was created and the meat, corn shells, beans, lettuce, cheese and tomatoes for their restaurants were now prepared in central commissaries outside the restaurant. At the restaurants, the prepared ingredients are assembled when ordered by a customer. Better employee morale, increased quality control, fewer accidents and injuries, bigger savings and more time for focusing on customer business processes are some of the successes of the new way of work . Taco Bell has gone from being a $500 million company in 1982 to a $3 billion company (Early 1990s).HALLMARKHallmark used to spend 3 years in bringing new products to the market. With more niche markets identified Hallmark executives were convinced that the product development process needed to be redesigned. Using reengineering, the goal was set to change cycle time to one year. They discovered to their surprise that two thirds of the product cycle was spent on planning and conceptualizing the card rather than on printing and production rework as had previously been thought. The concept spent 90% time waiting for a creative staffer to complete a new iteration till it was eventually finalized, In 1991, a new line of cards was brought to market in 8 months, ahead of schedule, by creating a cross functional team for product development.Although there have been many BPR success stories, the process became somewhat unpopular in the late 1990s. There were many organizations who went thr ough the attempts to redesign processes but did not manage to reap any of the myriad benefits promised. So it is essential to plan carefully before undertaking this exercise. First and foremost, a business problem needs to be identified. Are we manufacturing at higher costs than our industry? Is there a newer way of work that we have not brought into our processes? Do our processes seem overly complex? Are too many people doing too many similar things? After setting clear objectives and securing support from all levels of management within the company, it is important to approach the process as one of continuous learning and to keep an eye on new and emerging problems as well the existing way of work. The success of any BPR initiative hinges on how deeply a process improvement mindset is created and nurtured by both management and the process owners themselves.For further learning you can read through the following presentation.[slideshare id=8792334doc=bpr-110807054223-phpapp02w=71 0h=400]

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Childhood Obesity And Its Effects Essay - 1782 Words

Childhood obesity has increased drastically over the past years and has become a high health risk to children. In fact, childhood obesity has doubled in numbers in the past thirty years (Childhood Obesity Facts). Obesity occurs when an individual becomes overweight and doctor’s diagnose a patient by using the body mass index or BMI scale. Obesity causes many diseases in children which cannot be cured without a doctor, in result, childhood obesity drives high health care costs. Since little effort has been put forward to prevent childhood obesity the existence of this disease has begun to skyrocket in numbers. The number of children who suffer from obesity have greatly increased over the years so, people have to come up with a solution to prevent obesity. However, it will take more than just one solution to prevent childhood obesity, it will take many. Without the prevention of obesity future generations could be in serious trouble with health issues. Childhood obesity should b e prevented by showing the youth that healthy will benefit them in life, therefore, parents start by guiding children in the correct direction with their eating habits, limit their fast food intake, and fight the market for unhealthy foods so that children are not exposed to unhealthy options. The rising numbers of childhood obesity benefits the health care system because with obesity comes many doctors visits, and many doctors visits come with plenty of money spent in the health care system.Show MoreRelatedThe Effects Of Obesity On Childhood Obesity Essay1953 Words   |  8 Pagesfind out what has caused or what the leading factors to obesity are. Researchers are currently still doing research to find out what causes or what may be the lead to obesity. Childhood obesity is a serious medical condition which considers a child to be obese if their Body Mass Index (BMI) is at or above the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and sex. (Rendall., Weden, Lau, Brownell , Nazarov Fernandes, 2014). Obesity is on a rise in the Unites States and all over the worldRead MoreChildhood Obesity And Its Effects Essay1049 Words   |  5 PagesChildhood obesity is at an all-time high in the United States and should be a major concern for the nation. With childhood obesity steadily rising, it is imperative that actions be implemented to offset this trend. Childhood obesity places children at a significantly higher risk for a multitude of physical and psychological health concerns. It is important to understand the actions that have been set in motion that attempt to resolve this issue. Additionally, it should be determined if these actionsRead MoreChildhood Obesity And Its Effects1551 Words   |  7 PagesChildhood obesity has become an epidemic in our nation. Currently, more than one in six American children is obese, which is three times the rate as that of the 1970s [1]. Obesity contributes significantly to cardiovascular disease, different types of can cers, as well as diabetes. About 70% of obese children/adolescents have at least one risk factor for heart disease, such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension, and almost 40% of obese youths have at least two additional risk factors. Increase in ratesRead MoreChildhood Obesity and Its Effect1260 Words   |  6 PagesChildhood obesity is considered to be a serious issue among our youth. Obesity can cause many types of physical problems, which most are aware of, but it can also cause some undesirable internal feelings within children and adolescents who suffer from it. Self-esteem, or self-worth, is important as it helps develop personality and is a major ingredient to our mental health status (Wang, F. and Veugelers, P. J., 2008). Some have said obesity may even have a negative effect on cognitive developmentRead MoreChildhood Obesity And Its Effects894 Words   |  4 PagesChildhood obesity, a monstrous disease that grabs the attention of its victims so effortlessly, is a frightening concern among many. Childhood obesity is a condition in which a child is extremely overweight for their particular age group. This disease has rapidly increased its victims by luring them in with mouth-watering advertisements, pleasurable menu items and amusement. To cause matters to become increasingly detrimental to their health, technology has been introduced to kids at particularlyRead MoreObesity And Its Effects On Childhood Obesity1866 Words   |  8 PagesObesity is not an unfamiliar condition to the American population. Many researches, public health efforts, policies are focusing on obesity and specially on childhood obesity.in focus in United States (Ogden, Carroll, Kit Flegal, 2014). Many institutions such as CDC with its National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Institute of Medicine and U.S. Department of Agriculrual and Food have provided recommendations, surveys and developed regulations for obesity (Ogden, Carroll, KitRead MoreChildhood Obesity An d Its Effects990 Words   |  4 PagesChildhood Obesity has quadrupled in the last thirty years, and the number of children with obesity related diseases and health conditions reflect that. More and more Kids are developing what would be considered adult health conditions like osteoporosis, sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, and cardio vascular diseases, which usually only affect people later in life. Kids are not only developing adult diseases, they are physically becoming adults. If you were to compare a obese 10 year old DNA to theirRead MoreThe Effects Of Obesity On Adolescents : Childhood Obesity1068 Words   |  5 PagesThe Effects of Obesity on Adolescents Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health problems in the 21st century. According to PMC, the US Library of National Health and Medicine and National Institutes of Health, over 42 million children under the age of five are obese worldwide in 2010, and that number continues to ascend at an alarming rate. Obesity occurs when the body stores an excess amount of fat that is not necessary for the person’s survival. Some scientists have argued thatRead MoreChildhood Obesity And Its Effects1287 Words   |  6 Pagesother kids wear. Body image is everywhere you look. Obesity is defined as â€Å"Having a body mass index (BMI) above the normal range for age and sex in children† (Moglia, Dill, 2014). Obese children are subject to ridicule from peers, teachers, and sometimes even family. My five year old daughter is now bigger than her peers, weight and height wise. She has already come home from school with tears in her eyes because a classmate called her fat. H er obesity stems from a thyroid condition, but small childrenRead MoreChildhood Obesity And Its Effects On Children1188 Words   |  5 Pageslink between childhood obesity and advertising. There has been a rise in childhood obesity in the past few years and many believe, and have evidence to support, that it is partly because of unregulated advertisements aimed towards children. The health of a child is very important childhood obesity is something to be concerned about. The definition of childhood obesity is: having a body mass index above the normal range for age and sex in children. The definition of childhood obesity may not sound

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Racism in Ernest Gainess A Lesson Before Dying Essay

After the civil war ended many blacks and whites especially in the south, continued living as if nothing had changed with regards to the oppressions and poor treatment of African Americans. Narrator Grant Wiggins, of the novel A Lesson Before Dying, By Ernest Gaines, finds himself in a similar situation towards racism. Through his experience Grant is forced to transform Jefferson who was wrongly accused of a murder from a â€Å"HOG† into a man. Although Grant was forced to make jefferson a man, he himself became more of one as a result. Grant transformed from an ignorant pessimistic person into a sensitive and compassionate human being. Grant Wiggins, one of the few black males in his town to have a college education, is a teacher at a all†¦show more content†¦Grant consistently refers to them as the â€Å"Babies†. Grant throughout the novel also complain a lot about how he wants to leave and move out from his town. He refuses to accept the task he is being off ered and do a good for his own society as a black male. In addition,Grants attitude begins to change after a few visit at the the cell with jefferson. Jefferson opened up to Grant about how he never had owned a radio or ate a bowl of ice cream in his life. Grant stated â€Å"I saw a slight smile come to his face, and it was not a bitter smile. Not bitter at all†. This action was a turning point for Grant. Jefferson’s thoughts revived Grants emotions and helped him see the actual person he was. Grant learned how to become educated and think like a man, rather than being negative all the time. He figured out that he wasn’t just accomplishing a good for Jefferson, but teaching his students that as an African American, you shouldn’t allow the white take control nor advantage of you. At the beginning of the book, Grant more than anyone else hated Jefferson and refused to teach Jefferson how to become a man, but after a few visits to the cell Grant became Jef ferson’s friend. Grant became one of the few he could trust and share his thoughts with. Jefferson opened up to grant and took his advice for granted. At that point, Grant completely transformed from an angry man to a loving and caring person. Grant realized what it was to actually be a man and how a man becomes a hero! AShow MoreRelatedA Lesson While Living by Ernest Gaines1639 Words   |  7 Pages A Lesson While Living In a society where hardships occur daily, it is vital to have something to hold on to as an anchor. This reliance or commitment is in the form of friends, family, or even tangible possessions; however, humans sometimes have to fulfill deeds for others instead of continually thinking of themselves. Given these obligations, there results both a need and a desire to complete certain tasks for other individuals, for a community, or even for a higher power. In his novel, A LessonRead More Racism in A Lesson Before Dying Essay1677 Words   |  7 PagesA Lesson Before Dying is set in rural Louisiana in the 1940’s. The setting is ripe for the racism displayed in the novel. Ernest J. Gaines weaves an intricate web of human connections, using the character growth of Grant Wiggins and Jefferson to subtly expose the effect people have on one another (Poston A1). Each and every character along the way shows some inkling of being a racist. However, Paul is an exception. He treats eve ryone as if he or she is equal to him whether the person is blackRead More Racism and African-American Family Breakdown as Themes in Essay2349 Words   |  10 PagesIconic Contemporary Themes Displayed: Ernest J. Gainess A Lesson Before Dying I was not there, yet I was there. No, I did not go to the trial, I did not hear the verdict, because I knew all the time what it would be... (3). Ernest J. Gaines begins his contemporary masterpiece with a captivating and explosive first paragraph. Immediately capturing the readers attention, the fast paced novel takes us on a voyage of thematic discovery. Through the voice of Grant Wiggins, a school teacherRead More Comparing Dignity in A Lesson Before Dying, Jane Pittman, and Of Love and Dust2674 Words   |  11 Pagesin Southern Society in A Lesson Before Dying, Autobiography of Jane Pittman, and Of Love and Dust      Ã‚  Ã‚   The ante-bellum Southern social system put blacks in a low economic and social class and limited their pursuit of happiness.   The aristocracy firmly held blacks in emotional and spiritual slavery. Cajuns, Creoles and poor whites maintained a low status in society, which frustrated them because they felt they should be superior to blacks and equal to whites. Racism was a base of southern societyRead More The Evolution of Grant in Ernest J. Gaines A Lesson Before Dying2726 Words   |  11 PagesAfter the Civil War ended, many blacks and whites, especially in the South, continued living as if nothing had changed with regards to the oppression and poor treatment of African Americans. Narrator Grant Wiggins, of Ernest J. Gaines A Lesson Before Dying, possesses a similar attitude toward race relations. Through his experiences with a young man wrongly accused of murder, Grant transforms from a pessimistic, hopeless, and insensitive man into a more selfless and compassionate human being who

Debate Final Exam Free Essays

July 13, 2007 Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. Today our resolution is legalization of drugs does not damage society. We are on the negative group strongly against this resolution. We will write a custom essay sample on Debate Final Exam or any similar topic only for you Order Now Let’s look at the important points. The affirmative team had four points: personal behavior, price, safety and management. Their first point is personal behavior. They said that everyone has the right to choose his or her own lifestyle. It’s true. But one’s own choice should be based on social morality and within limits. If anyone just goes straight to do what they want, the society even the whole world will be out of control. The affirmative team didn’t consider this undeniable principle. In addition, taking drugs is not a good way to relax and entertain. Their second point is price. They said that if drug was legislated by the government, the black-markets will disappear. It’s not necessarily true that the black-markets will disappear. Because many markets legalized still have black markets out of the government’s reach. They also said that the government would lower the price of drugs so that drug users will not be forced to do criminals in order to get the money for drugs. First, the government might lower the price but the degree will be limited, for the costs of drugs are still high and expensive. It remains a money problem for the drug users. So it’s not true that legalization of drugs will decrease criminals. Second, the lower the price is, the more drug users are. Their third point is safety. They said that the pure heroin do very little harm to human body. It’s not true. Because no matter how pure the heroin is, it still does harm to human body for is a kind of medicine that has effect on human body. Not only that, drugs may cause both mental and physical disease, like cancer. Their fourth point is management. They said that drug users increased year by year is because of the action of forbidding drugs. Actually, it’s the opposite. America is one of the countries who has legalized drugs but still among the top countries with most drug users. As for china, we have law to forbid drugs and the drug abuse is not as serious as those countries. On out side, we have three points to support our opinion: heath, harmonious society and money. Our first point is health. Obviously, drugs will do great harm to people both physically and mentally. If the government legalizes drugs, the convenience and lower price will cause more and more drug users, because drugs could be bought everywhere just like food. So why take something that is harmful to us? Our second point is harmonious society. First, drug users will cause family problems. The costs of drugs come from family. That’s a very reason for divorce. Divorce will cause many other social problems. Second, legalization of drugs will have bad effect on adolescence. So naive are they, they have the curiosity of imitating adults, such as smoking. Our third point is money. Drug users will spend a lot of money on it. If the price is lowed by the government, the drug users will take more, after all, high price is a limitation for their habits. That’s all. Thank you. How to cite Debate Final Exam, Papers

Friday, April 24, 2020

Johnny Appleseed and Today’s Apples Essay Example

Johnny Appleseed and Today’s Apples Paper â€Å"The Apple† details the story of both the fruit, but more importantly, Johnny Appleseed, the legendary man who, two hundred years ago, crossed the Midwestern part of the country (Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana area), spreading apple seeds around in order to encourage apple trees to grow.   His real name was John Chapman, and he is said to be something of a strange man, one who was convinced of his duality with nature (he was a vegetarian, never rode horses or chopped down trees, and punished himself for hurting any creature, no matter how small, and even by accident). The author is attempting to trace Johnny Appleseed’s path across Ohio, and to discover his true reasons for planting apples.   According to science, apple seeds do not produce ‘normal’ apple trees.   Only tree cloning can do this.   Apple seeds produce terribly bitter fruit that is usually used for producing alcohol.   So, Johnny Appleseed was bringing alcohol to the colonies.   He moved continually, planting apple seeds where he knew a town would spring up in a few years, and when it did, he would sell the small apple trees for profit.   This was good business practice, as most people selling land required that the buyers plant orchards, to encourage them to keep and use their land. We will write a custom essay sample on Johnny Appleseed and Today’s Apples specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Johnny Appleseed and Today’s Apples specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Johnny Appleseed and Today’s Apples specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Sweetness is another popular reason for the apple.   Sugar wasn’t common in the frontier times, and any sweetness came from fruit.   The apple was among the sweetest.   This sweetness, of course, lent itself well to the creation of alcohol.   Alcohol was necessary, though, because it was a safer drink than water, even for children, in a time when water was often infested with cholera or worse. A man named Bill takes the author around Apple Country and shows him Johnny Appleseed’s path.   They walk across country, paddle down rivers, and look at apple trees that had been planted by Appleseed himself.   Along the way, the author continues to ask Bill biographical questions about Appleseed, such as the rumors about his child bride who left him, why he never married, and how he lived everywhere and nowhere at the same time. Today, many varieties of apples still grow, some propagated by Johnny Appleseed.   Legends of Appleseed still exist in many different areas, as the author finds out.   The apple, and the man who loved it, are still a large part of today’s folklore, and real tradition.

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

We The People Means essays

We The People Means essays A long time ago in 1789, the term We the People, which is stated in the constitution, represented a very exclusive group. This term represented the white males that were landowners. As you can see, the world has changed a lot from back then. Here in 2002, We the People refers to all U.S. citizens and covers more diverse groups. The three reasons that this changed had taken place was because of the use of formal Amendments, informal Amendments, and there were many court cases. First of all, the formal amendment helped this change big time. For instance, the 15th amendment states that The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied... on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Also in the 19th amendment it is said The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied... on account of sex. Both of these formal amendments show an example of how the term We the People has increased in how many people it represents from then to now. Another issue that helped increase the representation of We the People was the informal amendment. Informal amendments are common changes that do not affect the wording of the Constitution. Some examples of informal amendments that changed the meaning would be the actions of President Roosevelt during World War II. The law at the time was that there was to be segregation between the black and white soldiers. The president took action on this issue and got rid of the segregation. This is an example of informal segregation. The last reason that helped to increase the number of people represented by We the People is court cases from the past and present. One big case, for instance, would be that of Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka Kansas. This issue started because of the segregation of blacks and whites in public schools. This changed a l ...

Sunday, March 1, 2020

Cryptid

Cryptid Cryptid Cryptid By Maeve Maddox The lovely word cryptid came to my attention in reference to the ivory-billed woodpecker. One of these birds, long believed to be extinct, was sighted in eastern Arkansas in 2004. As no subsequent sightings have been reported, the survival of the species is still disputed. Cryptid is of recent coinage, suggested in 1983 by J. E. Wall in a publication of the International Society of Cryptozoology, as a word â€Å"to replace sensational and often misleading terms like monster.† Note: The Google Ngram Viewer shows use of cryptid as early as 1963, but the appearance in the ISC newsletter is most likely the cause of the word’s meteoric rise from 1990 to the present. Cryptozoology may be a pseudoscience, but the word cryptid is a useful addition to the English vocabulary, joining other English words that derive from Greek kryptos, â€Å"hidden†: crypt (1583) An underground cell, chamber, or vault; especially, one used as a burial place and typically lying beneath a church. cryptogram (1827) A piece of cryptographic writing; anything written in code or cipher. cryptology (1844) The science, study, or practice of encrypting and decrypting information. cryptonym (1862)   A pseudonym or code name; esp. one given to a spy or to a clandestine operation. crypsis (1956) Cryptic coloration or behavior that enables an animal to conceal its presence. Cryptozoology (1968) The study of unknown, legendary, or extinct animals whose existence or survival to the present day is disputed or unsubstantiated. Cryptids more sensational than the ivory-billed woodpecker include the following: Abominable Snowman Big Foot chupacabra Fouke Monster Kelpie Water horse Loch Ness monster Mermaids Sea serpents Sewer alligators For a lengthy list of cryptids, see the Wikipedia article. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Vocabulary category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Bare or Bear With Me?What to Do When Words Appear Twice in a Row5 Keys to Better Sentence Flow